How does art inspire art, event/exhibit


L.R. Berger joins several artists and 3 other poets in exploring how art in one medium inspires work in another medium.

This question is interesting, and as most artists understand or appreciate, the possible outcomes enliven an essential creative culture, and there is plenty of evidence of this throughout art history.

As with an “ekphrastic poem” being inspired or stimulated by art, this creative inspiration can expand into or across other disciplines that can go beyond verbal description. What endures, hopefully, is an inherent sense of freedom dealing with ideas, having an abstract non representational quality, figuratively, surrealistically, and realistically, or as any imaginative, metaphorical form that stimulates or emotes.

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2020 – year in books


Here it is November, and a turning point in seasons, and you know the rest – political crisis on top of a world-wide health crisis.

Everyone is finding new ways of living, creating, working, teaching, and many are suffering great loss while struggling to keep their housing and feed families. Deerbrook Editions is fortunate, as many independent presses probably are, continuing to work since most of the work is remote normally. And many businesses, such as the printer/manufacturer that does the press books, found ways to continue while being safe. We are thankful for their still being there. And we are thankful for all the responders in the hospitals, the state CDC, legislators, and everyone ordinary or professional, think of those that work in grocery stores. Everyone is doing their part. And we are thankful for the orders that come in from our Website, through the distributor, and amazon. It all helps.

And while we keep learning and finding ways to keep marketing and keeping engaged with readers, there is nothing like ‘in person’ readings and visits to books stores. We all want to go back to normal.

One of my ‘normal’ things to do that helps me stay sane, is reading. After hours I listen to music and do visual art. I don’t credit myself, but some of my work is on the covers of books I design.

Here are the books from this year. Forthcoming books are being planned for 2021 and will be appearing soon.

These are in the order of appearance, Until They Catch Fire having recently come out October 15th, and is now featured in spdbooks.org handpicked list, so folks out west can order from them. Although we love getting orders on deerbrookeditions.com, individuals can order from spdbooks. And on the press Website I’ve updated the menus to include author names to titles, and just so you know, 2019 was a great year when the press released 11 titles of excellent work

A Rising & Other Poems by DAVID SLOAN

Blues for French Roast by Martina NewberryLove Is Sweeter by HC HsuDaybook II by Toni OrtnerUntil They atch Fire by Deborah Cummins

The year in books


Over the past year, from last spring until the current spring, Deerbrook Editions has been working on nine new titles. Most of which are available if only from the press Website, but many are at the distributor, and on amazon. Most of these have come out since last fall. Last fall On The Badlands Of New Times, by Paul Bamberger of New Hampshire, appeared.

On The Badlands  combed-by-crows-cover-grab  9780999106228

There are four new Maine authors in this group (if you go back a bit more into 2017 there are more, Combed by Crows by Dennis Camire, and one notably Lesser Eternities by Jim Glenn Thatcher, a finalist in the Maine Literary Awards for poetry).

Last spring two Maine authors appeared, Leonore Hildebrandt’s poetry Where You Happen to Be, and Margaret Yocom’s erasure poetry, KIN S FUR (ALL KINDS OF FUR),

Poems by Leonore hildebrandt  cover grab KIN S  SWYC cov 9-11 copy

Many of these books have been reviewed.

This new year two more Maine authors have new books coming out, Say What You Can, poetry by Elizabeth Tibbetts, and The New Plantation: Lessons from Rikers Island, creative non-fiction/memoir, by Jason Trask. There is also Maine author Dawn Potter with a new book of poems currently in prepress titled Chestnut Ridge.

9780960029303  Daybook cov grab copy  What Lies Beyond

There are still more books in the works for this year. One book of prose poems by Toni Ortner of Vermont, Daybook I,  a deluxe size 7 x 10 format has just gone to press.

More poetry from other places include, What Lies Beyond, poems by Judith Farr of DC; Came Home to Winter, poems by Judtith Skillman of Washington; and Tomorrow, Today, and Yesterday by New York author J.R. Solonche.

Came Home to Winter cover  tomorrow, today, and yesterday cover grab

To visit the Website and see what is available click here. A similar post has click on covers linked to pages, as well as drop down menus and an index.

Alcatraz for Today


Here is the opening poem from a fine book- Francis Blessington’s book Poems from Underground.

page 9

Praise for Poems from Underground

Poems from Underground is an outstanding collection, well deserving a place on any adequate shelf of contemporary poetry. T he whole book gives pleasure and stimulation. Francis Blessington brings fresh insight to every subject he touches, with a rare mastery of imagery and metaphor. Great art can inspire him (Goya’s Prints), but so can the sordid (Cockfight). His control of free verse forms is admirable, as well as his handling of traditional meter and rhyme, so well displayed in his memorable translations from Baudelaire and Mistral.

—X. J. Kennedy

New poetry from Deerbrook Editions


cover grab KIN S

In these poems, Margaret Yocom offers a new vision of Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm’s controversial “Allerleirauh” (“All Kinds Of Fur”), a lesser-known version of “Cinderella” that opens with incest. Erasing the Grimms’ words to reveal a young woman’s story of her journey to a new, full life, Yocom asks, What would ‘All Kinds of Fur’ say if she could tell her own tale? In ALL KINDS OF FUR , the heroine’s words rise.

Erasure is a contemporary poetry-writing practice. Poets begin with a source text of any kind and then “erase” selected words and letters, using one or several methods—such as whiting or blacking out their selections, or “ghosting” them with a gray font. What remains are erasure poems.

In her “Afterword: tale / translation / erasure,” the author explores the history of the tale “All Kinds Of Fur” (and its many, international versions) as well as her translation of the Grimms’ text. She also discusses erasure poetry more fully and mentions other erasure poets and their work.  Here is an excerpt about the author’s own erasure practice:

. . . For me, the process of erasure has not been “What words should I erase?” but rather “What words rise?” Erasure offers me a chance to make visible and concrete a conversation—perhaps, even, an argument— between two texts. Through such a poem, rather than an essay, I can disagree with other interpretations of the tale as well as the assumptions of its translators. I can also create an alternative vision that presents the way a young woman, a survivor of abuse, would tell this tale . . .

Available now only on the press site.

  Cover art: Painting Bear Girl by Anne Siems.