New events with L.R. Berger


Zoom only

Poets L. R. Berger, Peter Murphy, and Tom Schmidt will read from their original work with Q&A to follow. L.R. Berger will be reading from Indebted to Wind, Peter Murphy from Underwater, and Tom Schmidt from Like, A Metaphor. Preregister at kellogghubbard.org/poemcity.

 

L.R. Berger was Visiting Artist at The American Academy in Rome.  Her collection of poems, The Unexpected Aviary, received the Jane Kenyon Award for Outstanding Book of Poetry.   Peter Murphy is the previous Dean of Academic Affairs at Goddard College and author of Maps of Three Contintents  Tom Schmidt has published two poetry chapbooks, Enough to Drink or Drown (Kelsay Books, 2020) and Like, A Metaphor (Encircle Publications, June 2021). He received a PhD from Cambridge University and taught humanities for thirty years in California, Oregon, and Vermont. Her new book is Indebted to Wind.

Indebted to Wind new collection by award winning LR Berger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXPLORING THE SACRED & THE ORDINARY WITH FOUR WOMEN POETS
Fridays May 20, 27; June 3 and 10 from 1-3:30
Instructor: Catherine O’Brian
Guest Poet: L.R. Berger

Cost: $200

In this four-week class we will explore the “Sacred and the Ordinary” with four women poets: Gwendolyn Brooks, Jane Kenyon, Lucille Clifton and Eavan Boland. I will facilitate discussions, offer writing prompts and talk about revision strategies. Guest poet and author, L.R. Berger will join us on June 3 to share a few of her own poems, her writing process and life-long appreciation for the work of Gwendolyn Brooks.

This workshop is open to everyone. You don’t need to know how to write poems and you don’t need to know anything about the poets under discussion. Please bring a journal and pen plus your curiosity and imagination. Using the Twiggs Gallery’s art exhibits and diverse poetic styles we will generate new poems in a supportive environment.
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER VIA EVENTBRITE

or call

 

Twiggs Gallery
603-975-0015

Advertisement

Maine Writers push out


Deerbrook Editions has published Maine writers for going on 20 years. This video gives a short hit on each author and shows book covers. Go to Deerbrook Editions for more info, or to order a title, and remember, shipping is free in the USA.

Enjoy!

Prose poem collection is frank but also dreamy


Daybook II by Toni OrtnerThe most recent title, published last month, is from Toni Ortner of Vermont. The second in a series of prose poem collections.

Toni Ortner was an English teacher at the University of Connecticut, Monroe College, and at Bronx Community College, as well as at various high schools in New York state.

She has had 26 books published by small presses. Her most recent is Daybook II by Deerbrook Editions. She lives in Vermont where on the fourth Sunday of each month from 5- 6 PM, she hosts the Write Action Radio Hour on l07.7 FM and interviews writers and has them read their work. She is Vice President of Write Action which is a nonprofit group that supports writers in New England through a variety of events. Her recent work can be seen at vermontviews.org at Old Lady Blog along with reviews of her published books. She gives readings in bookstores and libraries in Vermont and New Hampshire.

Praise for Daybook II

Toni Ortner’s Daybook II is charred in the rubble of memory, and the surreal runs through it. Like Anna Kavan’s Ice she gives us a disturbed interior landscape that haunts our visions for the future with lamentation and dissonant song.

—Terry Hauptman, author of On Hearing ThunderThe Indwelling of Dissonance, and the Tremulous Seasons.

Visit Toni’s blog on vermontviews

View a preview of Daybook II

A stack of new and recent titles


DE titles spines

Lots of new books

 

Here we are in “a post-truth world” . . . a complicated world of media outlets, on the air and online, where rhetoric, jargon, imagined conspiracies, lies and deception permeate, leaving us to weed through with our educated mind and common sense, in search of bits of gnosis. 

Lovers of poetry and literature in general, weed no further. There is nothing pretentious about work that is made with a love of creativity, essential observation and experience, and full with imagination.

Deerbrook Editions has a pile of new and recent titles, some which might fit into your idea of “arts and entertainment.” Because we know that there are many generations and types of readers with varying tastes, we offer most titles in a quality preview form on issuu.com, and most of these are embedded on book pages on the press Website.

Then if you find something interesting, remember that shipping is free in the USA. 

The Chronicle Time


If it’s greek to me—Khronos refers to quantitative, sequential time; Kairos refers to an opportune moment, having a qualitative nature.

 

The idea that a writer writes one long poem is tempting to apply to other endeavors. Imagine one long painting or one long symphony.

If this idea stirs up contemplating time as nonlinear in an energetic mind, that the Earth turns and rotates around the sun, almost as if in the same location once removed, then might a person be entering philosophical thresholds of thought? Imagining time as a physical gift of sun and shadow, after humans thought the sun rotated around the Earth, the sun dial is placed in an appropriate place. Perhaps cloudy days encouraged inventions like the hour glass, an excellent example of the movement of a substance to measure time.

From here one can go further with large or minute examples of time as movement, such as the human eye moving over the pages of a book or a series of images. Perhaps time has come down to the division of a moment, as dots make up a line, movement of the works of a clock divide minutes by seconds or to whatever digital devices divide, we accept that time is relatively accurate, given that so much depends on the setting of clocks and datelines (International Date Line), imagined lines (longitude) on the Earth that the light of the sun seems to cross as the Earth rotates.

How does time apply to memory? Any given stimulus can bring up a memory. That memory branches out into others. Memories are not often chronologic. What we remember relates to subjects and place rather than time. There may be an initial time a certain memory places us but then a character, subject, or a significant event, takes us off into another time. Especially with a season like spring or summer, when years of seasons can blend together so that years overlap and memories rise based on a hub, perhaps an object, like an old ice box, a beach, a shower, clouds in a sky, and memories branch out from there.

So it is with poetry. One poem’s lines can span decades, yet time is subordinate to the ideas of the poem. John Corbett says, “A poem can be oblique and still be absolutely precise.” He says, “I read poetry the way I listen to improvised music. It’s not so important to interpret an improvisation as it is to experience it.”

To some, poetry seems a perfectly natural form, invented while walking for example, to express any number of emotions one experiences triggered by a significant event or after a long reflection on circumstances leading to particular moment or place.

Poetry and improvised music share certain lyric attributes. Emotion, passion, rhapsody, intuition, and other subjective inferences.

Borges called poetry a mongrel. One can conjure his meaning. Perhaps he meant indefinable. Because poetry can support many subtle nuances through language in ways other than does prose, it can seem to be secondary for a reader that has not regarded language possessing another rhythm, without linear configuration, or more than one dimension. In truth poetry may predate prose but this is not important to debate as much as it is to accept poetry as existing prior to Classical Greek as classical in its significance for early cultures.

To draw one conclusion, without limitation, poetry and music share qualities. When perhaps the first poems were songs, as Vedic knowledge was originally spoken, voice being considered a form of spirit, then the character of a voice is fundamentally musical or lyrical. How curious that these essential expressions, music and poetry, can be both ancient and modern. By understanding them we enter the less predictive, less logical movement of time.

When we accept language and music as abstract primal expressions, that time can be theoretical relative to their creation, perhaps we enter a realm of creativity that needs no paraphrasing.