The year in books


Over the past year, from last spring until the current spring, Deerbrook Editions has been working on nine new titles. Most of which are available if only from the press Website, but many are at the distributor, and on amazon. Most of these have come out since last fall. Last fall On The Badlands Of New Times, by Paul Bamberger of New Hampshire, appeared.

On The Badlands  combed-by-crows-cover-grab  9780999106228

There are four new Maine authors in this group (if you go back a bit more into 2017 there are more, Combed by Crows by Dennis Camire, and one notably Lesser Eternities by Jim Glenn Thatcher, a finalist in the Maine Literary Awards for poetry).

Last spring two Maine authors appeared, Leonore Hildebrandt’s poetry Where You Happen to Be, and Margaret Yocom’s erasure poetry, KIN S FUR (ALL KINDS OF FUR),

Poems by Leonore hildebrandt  cover grab KIN S  SWYC cov 9-11 copy

Many of these books have been reviewed.

This new year two more Maine authors have new books coming out, Say What You Can, poetry by Elizabeth Tibbetts, and The New Plantation: Lessons from Rikers Island, creative non-fiction/memoir, by Jason Trask. There is also Maine author Dawn Potter with a new book of poems currently in prepress titled Chestnut Ridge.

9780960029303  Daybook cov grab copy  What Lies Beyond

There are still more books in the works for this year. One book of prose poems by Toni Ortner of Vermont, Daybook I,  a deluxe size 7 x 10 format has just gone to press.

More poetry from other places include, What Lies Beyond, poems by Judith Farr of DC; Came Home to Winter, poems by Judtith Skillman of Washington; and Tomorrow, Today, and Yesterday by New York author J.R. Solonche.

Came Home to Winter cover  tomorrow, today, and yesterday cover grab

To visit the Website and see what is available click here. A similar post has click on covers linked to pages, as well as drop down menus and an index.

Thomas McGrath, a major voice


I wanted to put this out there, a friend and author’s post of one of McGrath’s poems which spurred me on to look him up. It is the kind of thing the internet is good for, and what writing is good for, we get curious, we get inspired, we read, write and teach. It is in the blood of a creative. So here is Pauls post of Tourists at Ensenada. 

You can also find some of Paul’s work there as well. He is prolific in posting poems by great poets and he occasionally posts his own poems from his book.

https://thebadlandpoems.wordpress.com/2019/02/11/tourists-at-ensenada/

Paul Bamberger, is, by the way, a serious poet in his on right. His book, On The Badlands Of New Times, published last fall by Deerbrook Editions, is, as Keith Badowski, Editor of Brick Road Poetry Press, says, ” . . . a collection filled with powerful poetry which depicts some of the most painful truths about our world.”

on-the-badlands-cov-grab-206x300

Now, here is a link to Thomas McGrath on Poetry Foundation.

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/thomas-mcgrath

Lastly, it is a new year and Deerbrook Editions has new books coming off the presses. Here is a link to a few. There are more on the way, and you can browse the menus and posts to learn about the writers of Deerbrook Editions.

https://www.deerbrookeditions.com/?p=2640

 

Came Home to Winter cover   What Lies Beyond tomorrow, today, and yesterday cover grab  SWYC cov 9-11 copy

One poem from the latest book, On The Badlands Of New Times


Source: One poem from the latest book, On The Badlands Of New Times

Endorsers have said Paul Bamberger’s book is “filled with powerful poetry . . . ” and, “Some of the most intelligent and challenging poems I have ever read . . . ”

Here is one poem from the beginning of the book:

Preludes To The Past

caught in the last improbable light of the pretty hour
nerve endings of paradox hum destiny’s long shot
tomorrow’s brilliant rational truth’s sharp tongue
swing of axe shadowing its own to and fro as desert
traveler crosses the slow red decay of dying sun and
small lie howls there is always something in it for
you but we who harvest wildflowers on the dark side
of the moon have our own brothers to keep
what studies we are slow steppers looking for caution
sign dreamers of lilies in shock time blind to
evening’s tomorrow no more than what meets the
eye no walk arm-in-arm dream lowered into the
dark what could have been
what are we thinking this no rags to riches story
no home sweet home let’s go home baby no sweet
dreams we got it made baby nonsense and the long
haul’s what brought us to this street multitudes
scavenging among the well-fed dogs old men pacing
cluttered rooms running out of time losing their
timing making no sense of it joyless hearts riding
their shadows down to where the rattled bones are
laughing door left ajar
and from the unlucky we steal long shots to pay off
the junkyard dog bone has its use

Review of I, Emily Dickinson & Other Found poems


Review of I Emily Dickinson & Other Found Poems

I, Emily Dickinson & Other Found Poems, by J.R. Solonche, is an absolute delight. I have read it more than three times. To do it justice, I’d want to quote liberally from the many priceless jewels—entries found in books, newspapers, field guides, menus, things read in bathrooms, overheard in museums—but I’m certainly not going to do that.

Often the pleasure in the found poem lies in the ridicule it carries, the smug joy of the reader in the crazy obtuseness of the anonymous source. Here this is hardly the case. Even Donald Rumsfeld’s “Known knowns . . .” rises a bit above ridicule, it being probably the smartest thing he ever said.

The opening find is from the index of Dickinson’s collected poems (Johnson). It lists alphabetically the first lines of poems that begin with “I,” the first one being “I am afraid to own a body.” These entries are arranged in quatrains, ending with a couplet. One hundred and forty-two lines later we read, “I years had been from home.” This is more than a trick; it is something on the order of a portrait of Emily Dickinson.

The last entry in this wonderful collection lists vocabulary books on sale at Barnes & Noble, so the last line is “Word power made easy.” Perfect.

—Sally Fisher

                    Sally Fisher’s latest publication is Good Question, a book of poems from Bright Hill Press

The Differences


A poem from Won’t Be Long; poems short; poems shorter; poems shortest, by J.R. Solonche.

Michael Meyerhofer said about Won’t Be Long:  “Sweet Jesus, this is great stuff!”

The Differences