A poem by Joan I. Siegel


A Passing by Joan Siegel

Joan I. Siegel is recipient of:

New Letters Poetry Award

The Anna Davidson Rosenberg Prize

The Poetry Quarterly Rebecca Lard Award

Atlanta’s International Merit Award

She was a finalist as well for the Pablo Neruda Poetry Prize

Joan Siegel’s first book Hyacinth for the Soul, published by Deerbrook Editions in 2009, has had a few poems read on The Writer’s Almanac. In 2012 Joan read at the Dodge Poetry Festival. A poem from Hyacinth for the Soul, On The Night Train to Marseilles, was selected to win the Rebecca Lard Award at Poetry Quarterly, a Prolific Press publication with a focus on modern poetic style.

A Passing, the new book from which this poem is taken, is available  now on Deerbrook Editions Website as well as on amazon.

If you purchase books from the press Website you do more to help the authors as well as press. Thank you.

Published widely in journals and anthologies, Siegel lives in the lower Hudson Valley of New York State. Emerita Professor of English at SUNY/Orange, she volunteers at a local no-kill animal shelter, tends to 10 rescued cats, plants a summer garden and watches it grow.

From the Back Cover

Siegel’s book is a meditation, a held breath, a chord lingered on and released, the silence eloquent as the music. In these poems, memory both preserves and fails, distorts and clarifies. She meets small deaths (a hummingbird, a cat) and large (her own loved ones, and victims of war and the Holocaust) with a steady gaze. But there is also the cherry blooming outside the window, Degas’ dancer, a child’s new language “that sputters off your lips and drops / ripe as a juicy pear in my lap.”

                 —Mary Makofske

The poems in Joan I. Siegel’s A Passing offer startling bardic moments. In a poem’s anguished speaker, a sudden transcendence takes place. In the reader, a sudden awakening ensues from a “window’s shocking brightness,” or a subtle “memory of a window,” or the profound emptiness of “molecules that never touch.”

             —Sandra Graff, author of This Big Dress

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Still poetry month


Three new titles for poetry available now on the Website at deerbrookeditions.com all are accomplished poets. They Join the rank of Deerbrook poets, all of whom garner recognition in some way. In the spirit of poetry month (aren’t we lucky, the powers that be give us a full month to wave the poetry flag) I am going to post a poem, and a graph about the author, for as many as I can in the remaining days.

Wars Don't happen Anymore by Sarah White

Sarah White’s poems resonate the irony of glory and human love.

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche has delight and sorrow, insights and more.

Poetry is like getting dropped off in New Orleans.

A passing by Joan I. Siegel

Meditations on what cannot be seen, the music of memory.

The Poetry of Joan I. Siegel


Joan’s first book Hyacinth for the Soul (Deerbrook Editions 2009) was called world-class by one reviewer.

A Passing, her new small but compelling book of verse continues to reach beyond the limits of everyday thought and speech  with Joan’s deft language that flows around perceptions and allows the reader to find themselves in the poetic image as it unfolds. Perhaps Joan can do this in words since she is experienced in playing piano, and often makes reference or will attach music titles to poems.

Here are two poems from the book that are indicative of her skill with language that seems to cross or transport us unknowingly through time and space.

A Passing p46-7

Siegel is recipient most recently of Poetry Quarterly’s Rebecca Lard Award, New Letters Poetry Award and Anna Davidson Rosenberg Prize. A finalist for the Pablo Neruda Prize, she was an International Merit Award Winner in Atlanta’s 2014 International Poetry Competition. Published widely in journals and anthologies, Siegel lives in the lower Hudson Valley of New York State. Emerita Professor of English at SUNY/Orange, she volunteers at a local no-kill animal shelter, tends to 10 rescued cats, plants a summer garden and watches it grow.

New food coming off the presses


A passing by Joan I. Siegel

A Passing by Joan I. Siegel may be atonal and therefore a well seasoned feast.

News update: These authors will be reading  January 28.
Time is 7 pm.
Place is Morrison Hall, Orange County Community College, 115 South Street, Middletown, New York.

Deerbrook Editions announces

A Passing by Joan I. Siegel, coming soon in 2015.

“Siegel’s book is a meditation, a held breath, a chord lingered on and released, the silence eloquent as the music. In these poems, memory both preserves and fails, distorts and clarifies. She meets small deaths (a hummingbird, a cat) and large (her own loved ones, and victims of war and the Holocaust) with a steady gaze. But there is also the cherry blooming outside the window, Degas’ dancer, a child’s new language that sputters off your lips and drops / ripe as a juicy pear in my lap.”

                                           —Mary Makofske

“The poems in Joan I. Siegel’s A Passing offer startling bardic moments. In a poem’s anguished speaker, a sudden transcendence takes place. In the reader, a sudden awakening ensues from a window’s shocking brightness, or a subtle memory of a window, or the profound emptiness of molecules that never touch.”

                                             —Sandra Graff, author of This Big Dress

Siegel is recipient most recently of Poetry Quarterly’s Rebecca Lard Award, and previously New Letters Poetry Award and Anna Davidson Rosenberg Prize. A finalist for the Pablo Neruda Prize, she was an International Merit Award Winner in Atlanta’s 2014 International Poetry Competition.

Jaon is also the author of  Hyacinth for the Soul (Deerbrook Editions, 2009)

 And 

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche
Beautiful Day by JR Solonche has delight and sorrow insights and more.

 

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche, also coming soon. A new author to Deerbrook Editions, JR Solonche’s Beautiful Day is a delight as well as it may be conundrum, for JR’s skillful introspection plays with the commonplace while illusively serving up poetic truism.

Preview some poems  that appear in Beautiful Day on Mudlark

“The spirit of Horace, the melancholy of time slithering away and turning all to dust, tempered with art, wit and good grace: Solonche’s is the Horatian spirit for our time and place.”

                —Ricardo Nirenberg, editor of Offcourse

“When his daughter poses a most difficult question, the father in one of the poems in A Beautiful Day, responds, I’ll have to get it right. / I’ll have to clear my throat, sigh as wise people / sigh before I say . . . Solonche the poet, like Solonche the father, neither sidesteps the crucial questions of the day, nor pretends to have the perfect answers. He sighs and crafts his way with words of care, of wit, of artistry.”

                                   —James Penha, editor of New Verse News

“Solonche possesses a deadpan delivery that delights in unexpected twists and word play that can turn deadly serious. He’s equally expert at both narrative and lyric, and the ghazals alone are worth the price of admission.”

                                                     —Mary Makofske, author of Traction, winner of the Snyder Prize