The year in books


Over the past year, from last spring until the current spring, Deerbrook Editions has been working on nine new titles. Most of which are available if only from the press Website, but many are at the distributor, and on amazon. Most of these have come out since last fall. Last fall On The Badlands Of New Times, by Paul Bamberger of New Hampshire, appeared.

On The Badlands  combed-by-crows-cover-grab  9780999106228

There are four new Maine authors in this group (if you go back a bit more into 2017 there are more, Combed by Crows by Dennis Camire, and one notably Lesser Eternities by Jim Glenn Thatcher, a finalist in the Maine Literary Awards for poetry).

Last spring two Maine authors appeared, Leonore Hildebrandt’s poetry Where You Happen to Be, and Margaret Yocom’s erasure poetry, KIN S FUR (ALL KINDS OF FUR),

Poems by Leonore hildebrandt  cover grab KIN S  SWYC cov 9-11 copy

Many of these books have been reviewed.

This new year two more Maine authors have new books coming out, Say What You Can, poetry by Elizabeth Tibbetts, and The New Plantation: Lessons from Rikers Island, creative non-fiction/memoir, by Jason Trask. There is also Maine author Dawn Potter with a new book of poems currently in prepress titled Chestnut Ridge.

9780960029303  Daybook cov grab copy  What Lies Beyond

There are still more books in the works for this year. One book of prose poems by Toni Ortner of Vermont, Daybook I,  a deluxe size 7 x 10 format has just gone to press.

More poetry from other places include, What Lies Beyond, poems by Judith Farr of DC; Came Home to Winter, poems by Judtith Skillman of Washington; and Tomorrow, Today, and Yesterday by New York author J.R. Solonche.

Came Home to Winter cover  tomorrow, today, and yesterday cover grab

To visit the Website and see what is available click here. A similar post has click on covers linked to pages, as well as drop down menus and an index.

The Chronicle Time


If it’s greek to me—Khronos refers to quantitative, sequential time; Kairos refers to an opportune moment, having a qualitative nature.

 

The idea that a writer writes one long poem is tempting to apply to other endeavors. Imagine one long painting or one long symphony.

If this idea stirs up contemplating time as nonlinear in an energetic mind, that the Earth turns and rotates around the sun, almost as if in the same location once removed, then might a person be entering philosophical thresholds of thought? Imagining time as a physical gift of sun and shadow, after humans thought the sun rotated around the Earth, the sun dial is placed in an appropriate place. Perhaps cloudy days encouraged inventions like the hour glass, an excellent example of the movement of a substance to measure time.

From here one can go further with large or minute examples of time as movement, such as the human eye moving over the pages of a book or a series of images. Perhaps time has come down to the division of a moment, as dots make up a line, movement of the works of a clock divide minutes by seconds or to whatever digital devices divide, we accept that time is relatively accurate, given that so much depends on the setting of clocks and datelines (International Date Line), imagined lines (longitude) on the Earth that the light of the sun seems to cross as the Earth rotates.

How does time apply to memory? Any given stimulus can bring up a memory. That memory branches out into others. Memories are not often chronologic. What we remember relates to subjects and place rather than time. There may be an initial time a certain memory places us but then a character, subject, or a significant event, takes us off into another time. Especially with a season like spring or summer, when years of seasons can blend together so that years overlap and memories rise based on a hub, perhaps an object, like an old ice box, a beach, a shower, clouds in a sky, and memories branch out from there.

So it is with poetry. One poem’s lines can span decades, yet time is subordinate to the ideas of the poem. John Corbett says, “A poem can be oblique and still be absolutely precise.” He says, “I read poetry the way I listen to improvised music. It’s not so important to interpret an improvisation as it is to experience it.”

To some, poetry seems a perfectly natural form, invented while walking for example, to express any number of emotions one experiences triggered by a significant event or after a long reflection on circumstances leading to particular moment or place.

Poetry and improvised music share certain lyric attributes. Emotion, passion, rhapsody, intuition, and other subjective inferences.

Borges called poetry a mongrel. One can conjure his meaning. Perhaps he meant indefinable. Because poetry can support many subtle nuances through language in ways other than does prose, it can seem to be secondary for a reader that has not regarded language possessing another rhythm, without linear configuration, or more than one dimension. In truth poetry may predate prose but this is not important to debate as much as it is to accept poetry as existing prior to Classical Greek as classical in its significance for early cultures.

To draw one conclusion, without limitation, poetry and music share qualities. When perhaps the first poems were songs, as Vedic knowledge was originally spoken, voice being considered a form of spirit, then the character of a voice is fundamentally musical or lyrical. How curious that these essential expressions, music and poetry, can be both ancient and modern. By understanding them we enter the less predictive, less logical movement of time.

When we accept language and music as abstract primal expressions, that time can be theoretical relative to their creation, perhaps we enter a realm of creativity that needs no paraphrasing.

 

 

The Family Muse by Sarah White


The Family Muse by Sarah White

          Pity the Muse
in our house: Mother’s
paintings hidden in the attic
like clandestine Jews.

a seldom-tuned piano,
refusing the arpeggios
of “Clair de Lune”

a teenage boy reciting
“Gunga Din” complete
with Cockney sounds—You ‘eathen,
where the mischief ‘ave you been?

. . . I ‘ope you liked your drink,
and he dies—
me laughing, lurching
from the room, vowing
to become a poet

and show my own book
to my brother,
who would never look:
“Poems make me feel
like a boob.”

But wait. Once, he and I
took a class and shared
a set of soft pastels.
He fashioned me an easel
I could balance on a table
and it all went well.

The Muse—that floozy
friendly with Debussy—
saw what we could do, us two,
and was so surprised
she swooned
and dropped her harp.

 

Nominated for a Pushcart Prize. This poem appears in to one who bends my time by Sarah White.

 

Halloween news, treats but no tricks


Probably the biggest news is our own Stuart Kestenbaum is the new Maine Poet Laureate. His titles continue to be popular. This and other news can be found on the new Website.

Other news includes a new review for No Passing Zone also reviewed in the American Book Review, along with Wars Don’t Happen Anymore and links to that review, as well as poems appearing in journals, are on the Website page. Take a look at the new Website with new navigation features like drop-down menus, pages for author’s info and books, and of course free shipping in the US when you order from the Website. In the past 16 months, twelve new titles have been added to the list, so check out the quality work.

Lots of new books from 2015 & 2016: check the site for the latest titles

The Vagabond's Book Shelf by Dawn Potter

The Vagabond’s Book Shelf by Dawn Potter

F.Fields cover grab

Richard Kostelanetz

Wars Don't happen Anymore by Sarah White

Wars Don’t happen Anymore by Sarah White

descent-poems-cover

Descent & Other Poems

The Conversation by Dawn Potter

The Conversation by Dawn Potter

A passing

A Passing by Joan Siegel

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche

Beautiful Day by JR Solonche

Middle of the Night

Middle of the Night prose & poetry by HC Hsu

Once It Stops by Florence Fogelin

Once It Stops by Florence Fogelin Cover photo by Rosamond Orford

Yellow Horses by Martin Steingesser

Yellow Horses by Martin Steingesser

The Congress of Human Oddities by Teresa Carson

The Congress of Human Oddities by Teresa Carson

The World Disguised as This One by Mimi White

The World Disguised as This One by Mimi White

Preview The Vagabond’s Bookshelf


The Vagabond’s Bookshelf, Dawn Potter’s new book is popular. Here is a preview of the first few pages.

In this luminous memoir, Dawn Potter considers her personal relationship with the books she has read and reread over the course of her life—works by Leo Tolstoy, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, and many others. Weaving a daily life into a reading life, The Vagabond’s Bookshelf is a celebration of our deep yet mutable relationship to literature and the world.

DAWN POTTER directs the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching. She is the author of seven books of prose and poetry, including the award-winning memoir Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton. She lives in Harmony, Maine.

go here to view this preview